A monumental loss

The whole of France and people all over the word are grieving, following the fire that burnt down Notre Dame de Paris cathedral.  As I was reading the reports of the fire on Tuesday morning, tears started to well up in my eyes.  I was so fortunate to have been able to visit the cathedral on July 14, 2015, and to have been on the gallery linking the two towers during the fly past that celebrated the national holiday.  The internet is awash with pictures and videos of the fire and its aftermath, and there are many speculations as to how and why the fire started – I hope you won’t mind that I will not repeat any of that here.

One thing seems to be certain – Notre Dame will rise again!  In the process, some long forgotten skills will be learnt anew, and discoveries will be made about the building and the structure of the cathedral.  If it feels like doom and gloom now, think of the many churches and cathedrals that lay in ruins at the end of WWII.  Most of them rose from the ashes and are as beautiful today as they were before the war.

I have every hope that in years to come, Notre Dame de Paris will be once more the pride and joy of Paris and France!

I leave you with a picture from happier days, taken from one of the towers during my 2015 visit.

Advertisements

The heartbreak in Paris

In the aftermath of the devastating attacks in Paris, messages of support started to come in from all corners of the world.  Thank you everyone – your thoughts mean a great deal!!  My heart goes out to the victims and their families and friends.

What I have seen of the coverage of the attacks has left me feeling devastated, and what I have read has been heartbreaking.

I went to Beziers last Saturday night for another flamenco show, and I went with very mixed feelings!  Two armed policemen stood at the entrance to the theatre, as theatregoers made their way in.  The theatre was packed, and before the start of the show an announcement called for a minute of silence to honour the victims of the attack.  Everybody rose to their feet, and you could have heard a pin drop during that minute!

After the end of the show, as the patrons left the theatre, there must have been at least eight police on the square in front of the theatre, all heavily armed.  I don’t usually like that kind of thing, but I was glad to see them there.  It made me feel less fearful and more protected.

Striking fear into our hearts is what the terrorists are probably aiming for.  Fear will affect everything we do, stopping us from going out or travelling, paralysing our lives and making us miserable.  Not allowing fear to steal into our hearts is one way of holding out.  Solidarity with the people who were affected by the attacks is another.

I leave you with these images of Le Tricolor flying in the Paris skies.