It’s wine O’clock

A couple of weeks ago, I mentioned that a number of wineries in the Saint-Chinian area were having an open day on December 8, 2018. ¬†In order to bring you a blog post, I had to go on a research trip! ūüôā

My day started at 10:30 in the morning at the Maison des Vins, the showcase for the AOC Saint-Chinian wines. ¬†The Maison des Vins is in part of the former home of Charles Trenet’s parents in Saint-Chinian – if you don’t know the story, you can find my previous posts here and here.

I had come to the Maison des Vins for a tutored tasting of some of the wines which had made the Virtuoses selection of wines from the AOC Saint-Chinian.  There were 11 participants to the session, which was led by Baptiste Poncet from the Maison des Vins and Vivien Roussignol of Domaine des Paissels.  We were led up an amazing and monumental staircase to the tasting room on the first floor.  Here was the room where pretty much every wine in the store below had at one time or other been tasted, to see if it measured up to the strict quality criteria of the AOC Saint-Chinian.  The room was packed with rows of tables.  Several tasting stations were built into each row, with each person having their own small basin and cold water tap!

The Virtuoses competition is specific to the Saint-Chinian wine area.  It was first held in 2014.  The competition is judged by panels of journalists, professionals and personalities in the wine trade, restaurateurs, etc.  Over the years it has been held in different locations (Saint-Chinian, New York, Montreal, London).

The entrance criteria are fairly strict, and winemakers have to enter three different vintages of the same cuvee. ¬†The idea behind that is to show the ageing potential of the wines. ¬†For this year’s selection (2019), 70 winemakers entered their wines, which were tasted by the 25 jury members in New York City. ¬†Before you ask, no, the jury members didn’t have to taste each and every wine! ¬†They were split into groups as were the wines – it would be nigh impossible for all but the most experienced tasters to work their way through over 200 different wines!!

For our little tasting, Baptiste and Vivien had selected the following wines:

Chateau Coujan – Cuvee bois jolie 2017
Domaine de Cambis – Les jardins suspendus 2016
Domaine des Paissels – Les Paissels 2017
Mas Champart – Causse du bousquet 2015
Domaine La Madura – Classic 2015
Domaine Cathala – Cuvee A 2016

Before we got to tasting all those wines, a little surprise had been prepared for us.  If you saw the picture of the tasting stations earlier in this post, you may have noticed three bottles standing next to one of the sinks.  There were four such sets of bottles dotted about the tasting area, each set contained bottles labeled with Syrah, Carignan and Grenache.  Vivien had brought these wines with him.  They had only recently finished their fermentation and had been drawn off the tanks just the day before.  The idea was that we would create our own blended wine with wines made from the three grape varieties that are frequently used for the AOC Saint-Chinian wines!

Four teams were formed, and we were given the requisite tools for blending, namely a measuring jug and an empty bottle for our final blend. ¬†We started by tasting the individual wines. ¬†The¬†Syrah had spent some time in oak barrels and was to add “structure” to the wine, the¬†Grenache was for roundness, and the¬†Carignan was for freshness. ¬†The colour of all three wines was amazing – a deep purple colour verging on black! ¬†This is where my multitasking ended – tasting and photographing do not go together, at least not for me! ūüôā

Once we had finished tasting the three different varietal wines, we set about working out a “recipe” for our blend. ¬†We started with 30%¬†Syrah,¬†60%¬†Grenache and 10%¬†Carignan. ¬†Next we tried 20%¬†Syrah, 50%¬†Grenache and 30%¬†Carignan. ¬†Finally we tried¬†30%¬†Syrah,¬†40%¬†Grenache and 30%¬†Carignan. ¬†We tasted each of these blends in comparison to one another, and yes we did keep track of our glasses!! ¬†A sheet of paper had been placed at each station, with number 1 to 6 printed on it!! ¬†We came to the conclusion that our winning blend was the 20-50-30 one and prepared our full bottle according to that recipe.

Each group submitted their bottle, which was then covered with a sleeve, and then we all did a blind tasting of the four different blended wines.  Baptiste had given us a simplified version of the tasting sheets used for the Virtuoses competition.

The wines had to be rated on appearance, i.e. colour and clarity of the wine, intensity and complexity of the “nose”, followed by various criteria of taste: Intensity/concentration/bouquet/complexity, acidity/freshness, tannins/structure, balance/harmony, “length” in the mouth, followed by an overall note. ¬†Each note carried points¬†and, as you can see, I rated the wine named “B” at 13.5 out of 20 points. ¬†I found that exercise to be incredibly difficult. ¬†Tasting all those wines was tough enough, but giving notes was tougher yet. ¬†Added to that was the fact that the wines were very young, and the flavours not yet very developed.

Did “our” blend come out with the highest score?? ¬†Nope, it came in last, but in our defence it was the first wine to be tasted, which, as Baptiste said, does nothing for the ranking. ¬†The winning formula was not too dissimilar to ours though: it consisted of 30%¬†Syrah, 50%¬†Grenache and 20%¬†Carignan.

Vivian told us that he prepares about 3 different blends for a cuvee before he arrives at the final “recipe”. ¬†Sometimes, final adjustments are made to the blend just before a wine is bottled.

Being a vigneron is a highly skilled job AND it requires many different skills: growing the grapes, turning them into drinkable wine, blending the wine, and finally selling the wine!  Before this tasting, I had no idea of just how the blending of a wine works Рnow I know just how much work and skill is involved, and I hope you, also, have learned a lot about all of the work, skills and abilities that are necessary to create a wonderful wine.!

Thank you to Baptiste and Vivien for this great experience!

After all the excitement of the blending, we tasted some of the winning wines, which Baptiste had selected for us from the¬†Virtuoses competition. ¬†I stopped taking notes after the first wine, which was cuvee bois jolie from Chateau Coujan in Murviel-les-Beziers. ¬†This was my favourite wine in that selection, wonderfully round, with a lovely “nose” of honey and pear (not literally, only notes of !! ūüôā ) and a great taste! ¬†Of the reds, my favourite was Domaine Cathala’s cuvee A.

With the exceptions of the three wines used in the blending, you can buy all other wines mentioned in this article at the Maison des Vins or via their on-line shop.

After a late lunch (the session took longer than planned Рno complaints though!) I went on to visit the cooperative winery in Saint-Chinian and then to Domaine La Madura.  More about this in a future post perhaps.

Drink responsibly!

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International Women‚Äôs Rights Day ‚Äď 8th March 2018

This post was kindly written by Suzanne, a friend and neighbour in Saint-Chinian. ¬†She’s a member of an association called WIC, short for Women’s International Club. ¬†The association is very active and brings people of all nationalities together. ¬†A big THANK YOU to Suzanne for sharing this visit!!


This year, WIC (Women‚Äôs International Club) chose to visit a rather special vineyard to celebrate Women. The vineyard is special in that it is run solely by a woman ‚Äď Lidewij – at Terre des Dames, just outside Murviel-les-B√©ziers – a beautifully situated spot.

The tour was interesting: after explaining the ups and downs of her adventures in launching herself in this new life, Lidewij took us for a walk amongst the fields of vines, showing us how bio-culture can regulate itself.

The lay-out of the vineyards in the Languedoc region is quite particular in that we have small fields of vines surrounded by hedges and trees, in contrast to other regions such as Bordeaux where the fields are immense. These trees and bushes create nesting places for all sorts of fauna, which have various effects on the fields: the birds eat some of the harmful insects. The quality of the soil is checked, amongst others, by counting the amount of a certain kind of spider per square meter. Due to the presence of the hedges, the spiders accumulate there and then are spread out over the fields by the wind.

The almond trees were coming to the end of their flowering season, but still carried some of last year’s fruit:

Lidewij pointed out the various species of grape that she grows. Unfortunately at this time of year, we couldn’t really appreciate this, what with all the plants being bare and waiting for their spring foliage.

Lidewij also explained how she tried to balance out yield and quality – a complicated equation, as it is almost impossible to obtain both at the same time. A certain type of pruning will increase the yield, whereas another way of pruning will improve quality.

The tour ended with a visit of the storage area and a tasting of a few very interesting wines, red and white.

If you fancy a very enjoyable afternoon, you can contact Lidewij Van Wilgen on mas.desdames@orange.fr. She speaks extremely good English and French, as well as Dutch.

Here is some more information about¬†Lidewij’s wines:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A perfect match

Here’s to the start of another year – let’s hope that there will be more peace and less hate in the world!

What better way to start a new year, than with a post about wine-tasting! ¬†Before Christmas, a friend asked if I would like to join her at a tutored wine tasting with food pairing¬†– she had won two places for it in a prize draw! ¬†“Of course, with pleasure”, I said without much hesitation. ¬†The event was organised by the Herault Department in collaboration¬†with the¬†Maison des Vins de Saint-Chinian, the official showroom for Saint-Chinian wines. ¬†The Herault Department organised a series of these events¬†between September and January, in order to make the wines and foods of the region better known.

The tasting in Saint-Chinian was presided over by Thierry Boyer, a professional sommelier, who regularly hosts wine tastings in the area.  The food which was to go with the wine was prepared by Frederic Revilla of the restaurant Le Faitout in Berlou.  Here is the menu:

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The evening started in the shop on the ground floor of the Maison des Vins, with a glass of white wine, whilst everyone signed in.  The wine was called Schisteil and came from the Cave Cooperative in Berlou.  It was perfect as an aperitif, a nice fruity wine, without too much acidity.

Once everyone had arrived, we were invited to climb the stairs to the second floor, where we were to spend the next few hours.

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Once everyone had settled down, Thierry Boyer (below, far left) started the evening by introducing his co-hosts: Nellie Belot (far right), the director of the Maison des Vins, and Frederic Revilla (second from left), the chef of the Restaurant Le Faitout.  The lady with the red apron in the picture below was helping Thierry Boyer with pouring the wine.

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Once the introductions were made, Thierry started on the technical part of the evening, explaining the ‘art of tasting’ in some detail. ¬†I’m no expert when it comes to wine tasting, and so this was all very interesting. ¬†Each participant was given a tasting sheet, where notes could/should¬†be made about various aspects of the wine, such as the visual aspect, the smell, taste and overall impression. ¬†On the reverse of this sheet was an explanation of the words to be used in describing the wines. ¬†All in French, of course, AND highly instructive!!

Once Thierry had finished his explanation, Nellie Belot took over to introduce the first wine, Domaine du Landeyran’s Saint-Chinian-Roquebrun 2013. ¬†My notes tell me that the grapes for this wine are grown at Saint-Nazaire de Ladarez, on schist (slate) terroir, which produces relatively small yields of 30 hectolitres per hectare (1 hectolitre equals 100 litres, and a hectare is 10,000 square metres). ¬†The wine is made with 70% Syrah grapes and 30% Grenache grapes, and spends one month in oak barrels.

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Next, Frederic Revilla introduced the food – blinis made with chestnut flour, topped with rillettes de volaille a la sauge, potted chicken¬†with sage. ¬†Somehow the French sounds more elegant, don’t you think? ūüôā

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Finally, the wine was poured, and Thierry continued to teach us how to taste! ¬†Take the glass by the base, so that your hand (which might be smelling of onion or garlic??) is as far away from the rim of the glass as possible! ¬†Tilt the glass to the side and examine the colour and the clarity of the wine, as well as the colour of the “edge” of the wine, where the wine touches the glass as you look down into the glass. ¬†Then we came to the “legs”, which are traces left by the wine on the inside of the glass. ¬†Finally we were instructed to smell. ¬†Once everyone had had a good sniff (the first nose), we had to swivel the wine in the glass and smell again – that’s called the second nose. ¬†Agitating the wine causes some oxidation and brings out the smells more strongly.

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As you can see, everybody was doing this very seriously!! ¬†After much sniffing and scribbling, we were allowed to taste the wine. ¬†No, the idea was not to have a good gulp but to aerate the wine again, drawing air through it and making noises almost as if you were slurping noodles or some such. ¬†The air causes still more oxidation, and brings out yet more flavours! ¬†Once we’d had our first mouthful of wine, the blinis were passed around – one piece each. ¬†I was so caught up in the tasting and note writing, that I missed taking a picture of it! ¬†My note on the food says ‘super’!! ¬†My memory of it is that it was very delicious, gone in a flash, and very good with the wine! ¬†About the wine, my notes say very dark, almost black, a nose which was spicy, with red fruits and a hint of caramel. ¬†The taste was a little tannic, and not too heavy. ¬†Overall very nice, but I wasn’t blown away.

The next wine was Vieilles Vignes 2014 from Chateau Cazal Viel, near Cessenon-sur-Orb, was accompanied by a mushroom pate made with soya oil, on a toast which had been lightly brushed with olive oil.

This wine was made with Syrah, Grenache and Mourvedre grapes, and looked very dark, with very long¬†legs. On the nose, I discovered red fruit and farmyard smells (those of you who remember the Food & Drink Show on BBC TV in the 1990’s¬†may¬†recall presenter Jilly Goolden talking of “bags of manure” ūüôā ). ¬†Thee are all kinds of funny ways of describing the smells of wine – and manure/farmyard don’t mean that it tastes of that!! ¬†In the mouth, the tannins were still somewhat strong, but the wine was generously fruity. ¬†This is a wine which would be good to keep for a few more years, but which was very nice to drink now.

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The mushroom pate was wonderful with this wine, and as you can see in the picture, the pate was topped with a little piece of mountain ham, as well as some celery and carrot, both lightly steamed.

The third wine on our list was Le Secret des Capitelles 2014, from the Cave Cooperative in Saint-Chinian, made with 65% Grenache and 35% Syrah.  The colour of this wine was lighter than the two previous ones had been, and the edge of the wine was pinky red, indicating that it is relatively young (older wines can have a brown-ish edge).  The nose was fruity, with some toasted aromas.  The taste was very round, very easy to drink!

img_1793This wine was accompanied by a tartar of hake, a white fish, similar to cod, which had been delicately seasoned with peppermint and licorice, and was topped with a leaf of pennywort (umbilicus rupestris).  The pennywort brought out a sweetness in the wine, whist the pairing with the fish worked perfectly!

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During a brief¬†interlude in the tasting, Thierry explained a little about corks, and why it is important to keep a bottle horizontal: ¬†corks have tiny¬†air pockets in their structure, and if left exposed fungi could grow in these pockets and taint the taste of the wine. ¬†I’m simplifying here, there is far more science to it than just that!

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On to our last wine, Domaine Cathala’s Absolue 2013. ¬†With this wine it was a case of keeping the best ’til last! ¬†The wine is made with a blend of Syrah, Grenache and Carignan grapes, which are grown on limestone terroir¬†near Cessenon-sur-Orb. ¬†The colour of this wine was very deep, almost black and the nose had hints of farmyard and something called ‘sweaty saddle’. ¬†I have the ‘sweaty saddle’ on authority – the¬†friend who had invited me to the tasting is an expert! ¬†The wine tasted spicy and fruity, and it was very delicious!!

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To accompany this wine, we had some baby wild boar, cooked in a stew with Sichuan pepper, mandarin and a little chocolate to thicken the sauce.  It was a pairing made in heaven!!

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What a great way to spend an evening Рgood food and good wine, and I learnt a great deal at the same time!!

Here’s a picture of the happy team at the end of the evening – they all did a wonderful job transmitting their enthusiasm for the food and wines of the region! ¬†From right to left: Gaylord Burguiere, who works at Maison des Vins and has wonderful Instagram feed; Frederic Revilla; Natalie Revilla; Thierry’s helper; Thierry Boyer; Nelly Belot, and two ladies from the Herault Department, who’d organised the evening.

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Thank you to Carole for allowing me to accompany you on this adventure!!

If you are in Saint-Chinian, do go and visit the Maison des Vins. ¬†You’ll be able to taste (and buy!) a good cross-section of wines from the Saint-Chinan area!

Sparkling all over

Earlier in the year I visited Limoux to experience the famous carnival.  But Limoux is a town worth a visit at any time of year. The reason?  A great drive, some wonderful architecture, AND sparkling wine!  Legend has it that sparkling wine originated from the Abbey of Saint-Hilaire near Limoux and a first recorded mention of sparkling wine dates from 1531.  The legend goes on to say that towards the end of the 16th century Dom Perignon stopped by the Abbey of Saint-Hilaire on a pilgrimage, and found out the secret of how to get the bubbles into the bottle, which he then applied to the wines in Champagne on his return there.

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Strawberry Hill Vineyards in Gloucestershire, England has it on their site that an Englishman called Christoper Merrett was the inventor of the process as he published a paper on it in 1662.¬† Wikipedia says that an Italian Doctor called Francesco Scacchi first wrote about the production of sparkling wine, and that Dom Perignon’s mission at his abbey in Hautevillers was to prevent the bubbles from forming in the wine. The more I read the more confusing it all gets – one of the problems with the internet of course…

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But I digress.  Limoux is along the banks of the river Aude, with the larger and perhaps older part on the west bank.  At the top of Rue Jean Jaures, where you enter the old town proper, are gate piers, nicely reminding me of the fortified walls which would have been here at one point.  As you walk down this road towards Place de la Republique you pass some beautiful facades such as this one.

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This house must be ancient,yet the carvings are still crisp in most places.  There was also a great shop window, and I have a feeling that they probably keep it going for some time!

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The people in Limoux really live their Carnival, and work on it year round!  Place de la Republique has arcades around three sides, which you can see in my Carnival post.  Just a few steps from there is a church, which has been made over many times, but I found some interesting stone carvings in one of the side porches.

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I wonder how long these guys have been there?

Walking through the narrow streets turned up a fair few interesting things.¬† I guess the imprisoned door knocker was to stop kids from playing with it?¬† Those iron grilles with the stylised cockerels are just amazing and I couldn’t pass by all those door knockers without taking a picture :-).

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Recognize that house?¬† Have a look at the second picture in this post, this is the reverse of the sign.¬† Widow Tailhan on one side and Tournie and sons on the other – I wonder if they were related?¬† After the walk I headed for the east bank of the river and to Maison Guinot – the oldest Blanquette house in Limoux, established in 1875.¬† I first came across this producer back in 1998, when I bought their Blanquette for a birthday party, and I’ve been back a good few times since.¬† If you want to find out more about the technicalities of what goes into Blanquette there are good articles on Wikipedia in English and French, the latter being the more exhaustive of the two.

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The tasting room at Guinot is packed with cases of different Blanquettes, and the tasting is pretty interesting, the range is definitely worth a try, and I’m sure you’ll be able to find space for a bottle or maybe even a case or two.¬† The website for Guinot has some lovely pictures from the cellars, and also information on their products.¬† Sorry we can’t do virtual tastings over the net yet!¬† The guided visits are by appointment only, but they do look pretty interesting – next time perhaps…

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Of course alcohol should be consumed in moderation, and please don’t drink and drive!

A weekend of summer fetes…

And what a weekend it was!  It all really happened on the Sunday, but the excitement was palpable when all the tents went up on the market square in St Chinian on the Saturday Рneatly aligned!

And then it began Рthe market stalls were all displaced and scattered along the streets, and tables had been set up in the gardens of the Mairie to feed the hungry mouths at lunchtime with a traditional grillade prepared by the rugby club.

The sugar dusted sacristans looked yummy (crispy puff pastry and almond twists), and the rude tomato was just too much!¬† Anyhow, on to the Fete du Cru – the 60 stands opened for business at 9am, a mixture of wine and Produits du Terroir, ranging from beautiful Mohair blankets, scarves & more by Jean Paul Dore from Sarrazo via sausages and cheeses, to marzipan fruits.¬† A group of local painters were showing their latest pictures and offered painting demonstrations, and another group exhibited model cars and other toys.¬† But I digress, you all came for the wine, didn’t you?

With all that wine where do you start? With a visit to the stand of the Cru, right by the entrance, behind that impressive arch made from barrels and pallets.¬† Here’s a table full of glasses, hundreds of them, all with a little attachment that allows you to hang the glass around your neck.¬† For 3 Euros the glass is yours and you can be off to try whatever takes your fancy.¬† There are also straw hats in case you get too hot, and wonderfully colourful aprons, in case you are prone to spilling your drink!Nadia and Cyril Bourgne from Domaine La Madura, in a relaxed mood before the rush of visitors! The Confrereries gathered, all decked out in their colourful robes and attended a church service, followed by an aperitif in the Place du Marche – the rose was very tempting, but it was a little too early in the day for me to start!

One of the reasons for not having a drink that early was that I wanted to take to the road – to visit the Fete de l’Olivier in Bize Minervois, also taking place that Sunday.¬† The “set-up” in Bize was very different, with the focus on Olives and Olive oil, but much less exclusively so.¬† The esplanade along the river was taken up with stands selling food and drink, and long trestle tables for the patrons to sit and eat and drink.¬† There were mussels (with fries) and grilled sausages (with fries), and there was another stand selling food without fries.¬† I loved the home-made bunting that was strung all across the esplanade – someone had made a big effort!

There were a couple of bands marching through the narrow streets, past a myriad of stalls, selling all manner of things – soaps, kitchen implements made from olive wood, clothes, more food and there was a stall selling ice cream made from sheep’s milk.¬† Absolutely gorgeous with unusual flavours – if you’re interested their website is at http://www.audeline.com/ .

Walking around the village I came across a gate which I’d never seen open before.¬† Curiosity got the better of me of course, and I wandered in.¬† The courtyard behind the gate is home to Domaine Saint Michel Archange and for the fete they had a duo of ladies playing steel drums.¬† Not your usual steel drum players, but classically trained, skilled musicians with a beautiful touch.¬† My video stars partway through their piece, but you’ll get the idea.¬† The ladies have their own website and a number of other videos on YouTube.

The river in Bize is of course always inviting for a swim or just spending time lazily sitting in the shade of the willow trees, perhaps with a book or a picnic, and if you are staying at Les Remparts or Le Figuier then all that is only a short walk away.

Back in St Chinian I got down to the serious business of wine tasting.¬† As you can see there were more people visiting in the afternoon than in the morning, but the vaporizers which had been strung all along the row of tents were helping to keep everyone cool, and the band kept up the atmosphere!¬† Oh, and that’s a car under all those stickers and posters!

I won’t bore you with a list of the wines I tasted, but I stayed with rose and I particularly liked the wines from Belles Courbes, Domaine Mont Cabrel, Domaine Maurine Rouge, Chateau la Dournie and Mas Champart.

Two wonderful fetes in one day?¬† Almost too good to be true, but it happens in Languedoc! ūüėČ